HashimKamali

Mohammad Hashim Kamali

Mohammad Hashim Kamali

Professor Mohammad Hashim Kamali is founding CEO of the International Institute of Advanced Islamic Studies (IAIS) Malaysia.

What Everyone Needs to Know about Shariah

Wednesday, 25 March 2015 11:45 Published in Articles

The information on Shariah provided in this paper is organized in 52 pages and eight sections, all in question and answer format, and is reflective of the classical Shariah positions and how they are applied or feature in the present-day Muslim countries. Some of the areas where modern reforms and Islamic revivalism of the latter part of twentieth century might have introduced changes are also mentioned. Each section features a number of questions of general interest, some topical and others informative of the state of the art. The purpose is not to provide exhaustive details on any of the themes discussed but to introduce Shariah in a nutshell, as it were, to readers with various levels of familiarity with the subject, Muslims and non-Muslims alike............. Download the full article in pdf attachment (below)

In this two-part series on 'Extremism, Terrorism and Islam: Juristic and historical perspectives', Mohammad Hashim Kamali, founding CEO of IAIS Malaysia, discusses the various forms of religious extremism, and how they triumph wherever moderation is weak............ Download the full article in pdf attachment (below)

Available in two-parts, Part I and Part II

This article advances an enquiry into President Hamid Karzai’s (r. 2001-2014) constitutional legacy with special reference to relations between the executive and legislature during his presidency. Before engaging in that enquiry, a brief account is given in the introduction of the developments during the months following Karzai’s exit from office. What happened during this period tends to accentuate the unresolved issues of Karzai’s presidency and put Afghanistan’s commitment to constitutionalism to the test. The events of the past six months also point to the need for clarity regarding the status of constitutional interpretation and judicial review, two necessary ingredients of constitutionalism that ensure the conformity of laws and government action with the constitution. Dysfunctional executive-legislature relations and ambiguities over matters of interpretation have often meant that disagreement over issues did not find prompt and effective solutions.

This article is structured with an introduction and six sections. The introduction takes a look, as already mentioned, at the developments after Karzai left office. The first section discusses the presidential system Afghanistan has adopted under the 2004 Constitution, and the succeeding two sections address constitutional interpretation and the question as to who has the power to interpret the Constitution. Sections four and five are devoted to a discussion of judicial review, and the conflict of jurisdiction over who has the power of judicial review in Afghanistan respectively. The
last section looks into the parliamentary powers with special reference to the use of the noconfidence vote by the Wolesi Jirga. This article concludes with a brief reflection back on the post-Karzai developments, the hitherto unmet challenges over constitutional issues Afghanistan is faced with, and the way forward toward solutions.

............ Download the full article in pdf attachment (below)

Available in three languages; 1. English 2. Dari, 3. Pashto

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